Gold Standard Project Based Learning

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A STEM based curriculum that uses Project Based Learning (PBL) as a vehicle.

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We adhere to the Buck Institute’s Gold Standard for PBL

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Students tackle authentic real-world challenges.

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Teachers serve as facilitators while children take control of their learning.

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An outcome based program designed to improve student attitudes toward learning.

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Teaching 21st Century Skills.

Studies comparing learning outcomes for students taught via project-based learning versus traditional instruction show that when implemented well, PBL increases long-term retention of content, helps students perform as well as or better than traditional learners in high-stakes tests, improves problem-solving and collaboration skills, and improves students’ attitudes towards learning (Strobel & van Barneveld, 2009; Walker & Leary, 2009).

The fact that students’ love PBL and it also happens to yield such tremendous results are the reasons why Innovation Learning has adopted PBL as the primary vehicle for our Innovation Stations (the STEAM component of our program). While there are many schools and even after school programs that use projects to support learning we go above and beyond by utilizing a methodology that has been proven to produce results. Projects are one thing but doing PBL well is quite another. To help teachers do PBL well, the Buck Institute created a comprehensive, research-based model for PBL – a “gold standard” to help teachers, schools, and organizations measure, calibrate, and improve their practice. Innovation Learning teachers are trained in the Gold Standard used in all our Innovation Stations. We incorporate this guideline to maximize learning, increase motivation and insure that we are producing results. The best part is that our students love PBL and cannot wait to participate!

Project-Based Learning (PBL) is an innovative approach to learning that teaches a multitude of strategies critical for success in the twenty-first century. Students drive their own learning through inquiry, as well as work collaboratively to research and create projects that reflect their knowledge. From gleaning new, viable technology skills, to becoming proficient communicators and advanced problem solvers, students benefit from this approach to instruction. Studies have proven that when implemented well, project-based learning (PBL) can increase retention of content and improve students’ attitudes towards learning, among other benefits.

Project-based learning hails from a tradition of pedagogy which asserts that students learn best by experiencing and solving real-world problems. The components of good project based learning include:

  • Students learning to tackle realistic problems as they would be solved in the real world
  • Increased student control over his or her learning
  • Teachers serving as coaches and facilitators of inquiry and reflection
  • Students (usually, but not always) working in pairs or groups

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